I am moving to France: The reality is setting in.

When I was in “obtaining visa” mode obtaining the visa is all I though about. I needed to obtain the visa, so as a result my thoughts were not as much on moving to France but on  collecting documents, saving money and learning French. Although I am still focusing on saving money and especially learning French, now that I have this work visa my thoughts have been changing.

Slowly, very slowly actually, the reality is setting in. The initial excitement came when I made the decision, but back then it was still a dream. Now it is not a dream and it is the reality and I am feeling a more dulled version of that excitement. Holy Moly! I really want to go do not get me wrong, it is just that sometimes I am a nervous freakazoid and the reality of the fear that I need to overcome in the next few months is what is causing that dulling effect.

These fears include:

  • The fear of flying
  • The fear of not having enough money
  • The fear of failing while I am there
  • The fear of not being accepted

Basically, when I review this list, these are basic fears a lot of human beings have to deal with.

What makes this situation a little perverse is that I am excited at the same time. And not just excited to go to France, but excited to overcome these fears before I go! I am excited because I am afraid. If you ever watch “How I Met Your Mother” you will know that the infamous character Barney likes to use the phrase “Challenge Accepted!” whenever someone makes a mere mention of a possibly impossible feat. When I look at that list above, I take on that same attitude: Challenge Accepted!

The only action plan so far is to chant and to avoid or brush off any comments suggesting I will fail, or any TV shoes (les emissions) that deal with crashing airplanes (When discover channel’s “Mayday” is on sometimes it seduces me in, but I will stay strong).

I am moving to France! Exciting!!!

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Reading Up On France

In continuation with my previous post about reading books about France, I will give you my final review on the ones I read.

I already wrote about “France, A Love Story“. What a brilliant book! You really get the first hand accounts from everyday people (women in particular) and their personal experiences with the country. You have a lot of positive perspectives about the country and a couple negative reviews. It may not give you specifics about tourist locations, where to dine, how to get around, etc., but it does ignite these feelings and sparks in the pit of your belly and make you itch alllll over to get on a plane and get to France NOW! These woman describe the love, the food, the culture, the scenery, the emotions, and make you feel like you are in France.

Then there is Ernest Hemingway’s “A Moveable Feast“. Criticize me if you must but I really did not enjoy this book. Although he is a nobel prize winner and one of the best writer’s of all time, I found this true account slow. I kept getting distracted, I believe what he was saying (as it’s a true account) but I didn’t believe in it. I didn’t feel the passion of France that I was expecting. Maybe, just maybe, my expectations were too high. This is also slightly a historical account because it takes place in the 1920s. I was never a history buff and therefore some things were slightly meaningless to me. I hate to admit it, but I didn’t finish.

The book I was most excited about was “France for Dummies“. I was just getting into it when the due date came up from the library. The library system has this amazing online feature where you can log on to your account and renew the hold for an extra 3 weeks. That is, if no one else has already placed a hold on the book, which in my case someone did! Oh well, the early bird catched the worm, so they say. From what I did read, it was informative. As in all the Dummies series books, it was all information and it was all useful. It compares to the other tourist books about France. It is also geared to tourists spending just a few weeks in the country, which I am not.

And for all the books I checked out of the library my favourite has to be “Les Petite Folies Du Jeudi“. This is a French children’s book. Kids’s books are very useful in learning basic grammar and vocabulary, and the story is so cute and entertaining. It has nothing to do with France, but as it is simple and I can understand it, it is getting me excited to start speaking l’amour full-time.

I really have to get on more books. My readers have suggested a few so I am sure I will have another book review shortly!

FL 6: Asking Questions

Here is some quick vocab before we begin:

Une Question = A question
Demander = To ask

There is no question about it, you will be asking questions in French if you intend to speak it or travel to a French place (like France). You will probably have to answer some questions as well. So here is a lesson on French questions.

Today I had another French lesson. I am learning French with a private tutor and now that my FBF is overseas I thought I would fill some of my spare time with some extra French lessons. I will not have 2 private lessons per week. In the first bunch of lessons I learned how to ask basic questions using “est-ce que” inserted into sentences (examples to follow). Now, as I am getting into more challenging topics, I am learning the art of inverted question asking (again, I will explain in a moment). These are two ways to ask questions but there is not only two ways to ask questions in French. There are three! The third way to to add a question mark at the end of a statement and raise your tone at the end of the sentence to imply a question. Following me so far?

Basic question asking words

Just as English had who, what, where, when, how and why questions, French does too.

Où = Where
Quoi = What
Qui = Who
Quand = When
Comment = How
Why = Pourquoi

Just structure the question with one of these words. It is easy!

  • Où est mon stylo?      Where is my pen?

“Est-ce que” Questions

One way to ask a question in French (probably the easiest way if you are just learning) is to insert “est-ce que” into a statement. Est-ce-que implies that you are asking a question and can be used whenever you ask a question.

  • Qu’est-ce que c’est?       What is this?
  • Est-ce que tu veux  à danser avec moi?        Do you want to dance with me?

Inverted Questions

The verb and the subject are inverted to form a question.

Example. Est-ce que tu as veux  à danser avec moi? ….”Est-ce que” is ommitted entirely and you are left with tu veux  à danser avec moi (You want to dance with me). To make this a sentence invert the subject (tu) and the verb (veux)…Veux-tu à danser avec moi?…Do you want to dance with me?

Adding a question mark at the end of the sentence…?

Just take a statement and add a question mark at the end of it. Use this with discretion.

  • C’est vrai?                It is true?
  • Nous mangerons à 8h?          We will eat at 8 o’clock?

This was just a quick lesson, gor a more in depth look at forming French question, here is a link!

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to demandez!

 

 

Slacking on French Lessons

I am so excited to get my butt moving to France! I actually have trouble expressing my excitement in words. You know how when you attempt to explain to your partner how much you love them, and nothing you say really measures up to your feelings? Well, this is a similar kind of excitement.

I am going to France and I will obtain a job and hopefully meet a bunch of people. Speaking French is going to be a must, a total necessity. My problem would be that I am simply a beginner at French. Even worse, a French lesson slacker!

I know I must practice in order to reach the goals I have set out for myself. I must, I must, I must practice. I started my run well (run being the study of French). I practiced and studied every single day, I was consistent with the date and times of my lessons, I reviewed over and over again, read and looked up vocab like a mad woman. And now, the one hour lesson a week is all I put into this (although I do practice conversation an awful lot with FB).

If I had taken this slacker attitude with the financial aspect of getting this visa, I would have never been able to achieve that goal, but throughout that time period, I remained determined, knowing that all my efforts would pay off. And now that the plane ticket had been purchased and all is in place for the attainment of this visa, I need to take on that same attitude with the learning of this beautiful language.

Discipline it is! And not for any blind reasons such as thinking that I need to be disciplined because discipline in itself is a good quality. I do not necessarily agree with that. I do not believe discipline is necessary all the time. But I do believe that all dreams and goals are attainable, no matter how impossible they seem. And attaining these dreams and goals doesn’t simply come with expecting it to happen without any effort. Action is key. And the action I choose to take is the dedicated effort and discipline to set firmer, more concrete goals (like the monetary value of the money goal) and really make this a reality.

So here they are, my new French language goals. Necessary, if I want to be successful in France:

  • Become completely functional within 2 months of being in France (November 15). Becoming functional means speaking all the time and understanding others.
  • Dedicate at least one hour per day to some French activity. This can be reading, studying verbs, the lesson, watching TV, practicing conversational skills. It doesn’t matter what, it just has to be French.
  • DOING MY FRENCH HOMEWORK. I have never been good at doing homework. Throughout my life I have been more of the kind of student who slaps together a magnificent project in the last minutes. Would that style cut it for learning French? Not sure, but I am going to do the homework this time.
  • Post at least one French Language post per week. Yes I will!
  • Remember these goals!

You cannot become a runner by talking about running!

Until next time…

Filling out the long term visa application for France

The title of this post spells out exactly what I will write about today.

As you may know, one of the very first steps I took towards moving to France was researching the types of visas and choosing one. After I chose the youth working holiday visa (2E) I logically printed out the online package (as linked on the right of this blog).

What I am trying to say is that I have had this visa package full of instructions, guidelines and the application forms themselves  for nearly 5 months. I could have filled out the forms months ago but instead I decided to save all the money needed, write my cover letter en francais, get the insurance, the photos, the photocopies, all-in-all, EVERYTHING completed. Yet, until a couple of days ago, these form lay unattended. I had peaked at them 10 or maybe 20 times over these 5 months but never dared touched them.

Why? You may ask. This seems like I pretty basic thing to do. Well, not when you are me! When this has been your dream for 10 plus years! When any mistake on those two pages can hinder your ability to obtain that visa! Ok, breather. I guess it is not that big of a deal. But when I looked at those forms all I could see were the side panels which read “for administration use only” and underneath this column lays two boxes (one to be checked off by the administration) reading “granted” and “not granted”. They will literally choose whether or not to give me the visa, right before my eyes, on that very application form. I better freaking fill it out correctly! On top of the pressure to fill these babies out perfectly, they come with a little glitch: The page attached explaining what goes into each box is wrong. The explanations do not match the boxes on the form so therefore I filled them out how I thought I should and had to disregard the instructions. French consulate, please review that page and fix it!

Finally, on Sunday, I built up enough courage to once and for all tackle these forms. I was as honest as I could have been, was very straight forward in all the boxes and I also have a verbal explanation ready for the boxes I filled out that may be ambiguous to someone trying to figure out what my plans are exactly.

Thankfully I have my boyfriend’s parents in France who are serving as my “home-stay” family just in case anything goes wrong while I am there. I added them into my application and their address as the place I will stay, even though I also wrote I will immediately look for a place in Lille. I am sure this could seem a little confusing to the consulate. “She says she will live in Lille when she arrives but she also says she will stay in Reims.” I tried my best to make the situation very clear to them. But anyway, I am ready with responses to any of their questions.

That box will be checked “granted” I am sure!

France, A Love Story

The title of this post is also the title of the latest book I just read.

The book is edited by Camille Cusuman but is a compilation of stories from many women, talking about their love of France.

The short stories’ authors include M.F.K. Fisher, Ruth Reichl, and Alice Kaplan, well known female writers mainly from the U.S.

Some of the tales are of woman moving to the country. They introduce life in their towns, their neighbours, and everyday tribulations.

Some stories tell of women who take a vacation and experience love with a French Man.

The book introduces the love affairs women have had with the food of France, the people, the lifestyle and the French language.

Definitely give it a read if you want first hand accounts of the life in France as a traveler.

My Mini Quebec Adventure (part 2)

Bonjour mes amis!

I am on the VIA train right now, heading home from my Quebec adventure. I have to say that my experience here far past any expectations I could have had.

I have a reader who just emailed me and said that he traveled to France and really enjoyed his time. The key to his enjoyable time was detaching himself from all expectations during the trip. This is kind of/sort of the attitude I took for my short Quebec adventure. I left my expectations behind and was committed to having a great time with Mon Homme.

All of the food in Quebec was mouth watering. We dined on typical French cuisine the entire time, sometimes splurging on a multi-coursed dinner and other times scrimping our wallets and purchasing la nourriture from the grocery store (supermarché). It was simply all délicieux.

Here is the list of the top 5 things we did:

  1. Les Chutes de Montmorency (The Montmorency Falls)- They are massive! The local transit bus “800” took us all the way there (it was around a thirty minute ride from Old Quebec). We were led from a small walking path to a huge bridge that takes you right over the falls. Honestly, we were not expecting much but they sure are impressive. We then proceeded to walk down what seemed like 2000 stairs to the bottom of the falls to get soaking wet. It was an all around awesome time!
  2. Lower Old Quebec- Little did we know until the evening of last night that Quebec has a “secret” area full of cobblestone roads and cute little shops. Most of old Quebec is built around the Chateau Frontenac, near the top of a large hill, surrounded by the walls of the historical fort. The roads are paved, there are many shops and restaurants and a lot of tourists. We had walked the streets at least ten times until I turned to Mon Homme and said “I remember that Quebec has an area with cobblestone roads”. To arrive there we had to find the staircases behind most of the main roads that took us to the lower Quebec. This area is so charming and we found our restaurant for the second night here!
  3. Shopping- I don’t know if it is completely true, but clothes and shoes just seemed cheaper. We really needed to sift through the tons of tourist shops to find the true gems, a cute dress shop, another maple syrup store, some other crafty places. If you travel here, dedicate at least one day to shopping.
  4. Eating- Go anywhere! The price range is the same for every single restaurant so just  choose one! Besides the delectable wine and beef tartar, the sausages, burgers and soups are some of the finest too!
  5. Speaking French-I am happy to report that I was able to function with the French language. It is not the same French that is used in France as the languages really evolved differently since the French settled here eons ago. But, never the less, everyone speaks only French (it really is hard to squeeze the English out of them) and I loved the feeling of being able to understand and speak.

If you are traveling to Quebec any time soon, please drop me a line and I could recommend some great places for you to visit!

Thanks for reading!